What Is A Cataract?

A cataract is a progressive clouding of the eye’s naturally clear lens. The lens focuses light rays on the retina, the layer of light-sensing cells lining the back of the eye. When the lens becomes cloudy, the light rays cannot pass through it easily. Early changes may not disturb vision, but over time cataracts typically result in blurred or fuzzy vision and sensitivity to light. Other common symptoms include glare, starbursts, halos, difficult distance or near vision, distorted vision, and fading colors.

Cataracts are the most common cause of preventable blindness in the world. Fortunately, cataracts can be treated. More than one million cataract surgeries are performed in the United States each year. It is among the most successful operations performed today.